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9 things you need to know about epilepsy – and how to deal with a seizure

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9 things you need to know about epilepsy – and how to deal with a seizure

By Nel Staveley

Epilepsy is a well-known condition, in that most people have heard of it and know that it can cause seizures, or fits, in sufferers.

What’s perhaps less understood is what these seizures look like, and how you should act if one of the 600,000 or so epilepsy sufferers in the UK had a fit in front of your eyes.

“If you’ve never come across epilepsy before you probably have no idea what it looks like,” says Phil Lee, chief executive of the UK’s Epilepsy Action.

“Of course there are all the old stereotypes – people rolling on the ground, frothing at the mouth or running amok and scaring everyone. If you’ve never seen epilepsy before you might be forgiven for thinking that’s what it’s all about.”

Safe to say, it’s not – see our advice on what to do if someone’s having an epileptic seizure at the bottom of this story.
Here’s what else you need to know about epilepsy.

Epilepsy mixes brain messages

Electrical activity is happening in our brain all the time, but an epileptic seizure happens when “there is a sudden burst of intense electrical activity in the brain,” says an Epilepsy Action spokesperson.
“This epileptic activity causes a temporary disruption to the way the brain normally works, so the brain’s messages become mixed up.”

Epilepsy is unique…

“There are many different types of seizure, and each person will experience epilepsy in a way that is unique to them,” says the Epilepsy Action spokesperson.

…And hard to spot

“Other than seizures, there are no real obvious ways to tell if someone has epilepsy if you don’t know them. That is why it is often called the hidden condition.”

There are many causes…

While some people may be born with epilepsy or begin to be affected very young, some people develop it later in life, perhaps as the result of a brain injury, a stroke, an infection like meningitis, or a brain tumour. In around six out of 10 people, doctors don’t know the cause of their epilepsy.

…And many triggers

Flickering lights are probably the most recognised triggers among non-epilepsy sufferers, but there are many more things that can spur a seizure. Tiredness, stress, alcohol, periods and missing meals are also all common triggers for seizures.

Epilepsy has many symptoms

Again, the most recognised symptom of epilepsy is the full-blown seizure, but most people will have symptoms before it gets to this stage and will know that a seizure is coming.

“Some people may have a sensation beforehand, such as a strange taste in the mouth or a headache, or ‘auras’ which can hint at a seizure starting,” says Epilepsy Action.

Other signs include pins and needles, deja vu, stiffness, and intense feelings of fear or happiness, confusion, falling, sleepiness and loss of control of bladder or bowel. Knowing a seizure is coming can give people time to prepare – warning people near them and making sure they’re in a safe space.

“For many, however, a seizure can literally come from nowhere with no warning. Even those who do experience signs or auras may not have them exactly before the start of a seizure.”

A seizure doesn’t always mean epilepsy

Epilepsy is defined as the tendency to have recurrent seizures, and few people are diagnosed after only one seizure – five people in every 100 will have an epileptic seizure at some point in their lives, but only four of them will develop epilepsy.

Epilepsy can control people’s lives…

This Purple Day, Epilepsy Action is keen to show how epilepsy affects people’s lives https://www.epilepsy.org.uk/purple/living-with-epilepsy.

“When you see the lives of people affected by epilepsy and hear their stories then you will see exactly what epilepsy looks like,” says Epilepsy Action’s Phil Lee.

“It will open your eyes and inspire you. You’ll see its many faces. You’ll see how epilepsy can touch any part of a person’s life, how it can undermine your confidence and shatter your self-esteem. How it can take away your dreams and opportunities in life.”

…But it doesn’t have to

“You can also see how people refuse to be ruled by epilepsy. How they fight back and regain control of their life. How they succeed and achieve and can be happy,” he stresses.

What to do if someone’s having a seizure

Tonic-Clonic seizures

The person goes stiff, loses consciousness and then falls to the ground. This is followed by jerking movements. A blue tinge around the mouth is likely. This is due to irregular breathing. Loss of bladder and/or bowel control may happen. After a minute or two, the jerking movements should stop and consciousness may slowly return.

Do…

• Protect the person from injury and remove harmful objects from nearby;
• Cushion their head;
• Look for an epilepsy identity card or identity jewellery;
• Aid breathing by gently placing them in the recovery position once the seizure has finished;
• Stay with the person until recovery is complete;
• Be calmly reassuring.

Don’t…

• Restrain the person’s movement;
• Put anything in the person’s mouth;
• Try to move them unless they are in danger;
• Give them anything to eat or drink until they are fully recovered;
• Attempt to bring them around.

Focal (partial) seizures

Sometimes the person may not be aware of their surroundings or what they are doing. They may pluck at their clothes, smack their lips, swallow repeatedly, and wander around.

Do…

• Guide the person from danger;
• Stay with the person until recovery is complete;
• Be calmly reassuring;
• Explain anything that they may have missed.

Don’t…

• Restrain the person;
• Act in a way that could frighten them, such as making abrupt movements or shouting at them;
• Assume the person is aware of what is happening, or what has happened;
• Give the person anything to eat or drink until they are fully recovered;
• Attempt to bring them around.
Source:   *******

Paleo diet versus the ketogenic diet

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Paleo diet versus the ketogenic diet

In the world of diets, it’s hard to pick the one best suited for you. This is why it’s important to understand each diet and how each one can help you achieve your goals. Both the Paleo diet and the ketogenic diet have been increasing in popularity. Although you may have a broad understanding of them, before you start either one it’s good to understand them in-depth. Here we compare these two popular diets to reveal their similarities and differences so you can make an informed decision.

What is the ketogenic diet?

Typically when a person starts a diet the reason is to lose weight. The ketogenic diet has been praised for its ability to promote quick and effective weight loss. But how you ask? Well…

The premise behind the ketogenic diet is that the body will use its own fat-burning abilities to lose weight within 10 days. Although this may be appealing it’s important to know that some consider this diet to be dangerous.

On the ketogenic diet, you are restricted to a low or no-carbohydrate meal plan. By doing this the body goes into a state called “ketosis.” When we consume little to no carbohydrates molecules called ketones to build up. The process of ketosis restricts conventional sources of energy – carbohydrates – so the body begins to use its own fat supply to produce energy.

The nutrient intake on a ketogenic diet

Paleo diet versus the ketogenic diet

  • 70-75% of calories from fat (calorie counting is optional)
  • 20-25% from protein
  • 5-10% from carbohydrate on a daily basis

Difference between the Paleo diet and the ketogenic diet

The Paleo diet works on the premise of eating like our ancestors – or cavemen. The diet restricts artificial food and uses only organic, free-range, natural items. Food item wise, the Paleo diet is similar to the ketogenic diet as it limits the use of carbohydrates but differs as you do not eliminate them completely. Below are some other notable differences between the Paleo diet and the ketogenic diet.

Ketogenic DietPaleo Diet
Level of carbohydratesLowLow to medium
GoalWeight lossBetter health (weight loss may still occur)
Is soy sauce with wheat allowed?YesNo, because it irritates the gut
Is canola oil allowed?YesNo, because it contains omega-6 which is considered unhealthy
Are sweet potatoes allowed?NoYes
Is tofu allowed?YesNo, soy leads to inflammation
Is dairy allowed?Only full-fat milkMaybe, only if tolerated by the individual

As you can see, there are some very clear differences and limitations to each diet. Yet, the Paleo diet presents itself as a life-long eating regimen, whereas the ketogenic can only be sustained for a short amount of time.

Certain risks regarding the ketogenic diet

The Paleo diet removes many foods that have been shown to cause irritation and inflammation in the gut. The ketogenic diet, though, eliminates many foods simply because they contain carbohydrates.

The debate on whether or not the ketogenic diet is healthy is ongoing. Some experts feel the ketogenic diet is helpful for those who are obese or significantly overweight. Other experts suggest the weight loss is unsustainable and will simply come back within a year.

Another side effect of the body entering ketosis is muscle loss. A build-up of ketones can increase the risk of illness or complications. One thing is for certain, the ketogenic is not meant for long-term use.

It’s important to note that the ketogenic diet should not be conducted without professional supervision. Without the guidance of a doctor or dietician, there is room for error, which raises the risk of illness and complications. If you are interested in the ketogenic diet it’s best you speak with a medical professional.

Related Reading:

Paleo diet versus the ketogenic diet

Paleo diet: Is eating like a caveman best for our health?

Diets come and diets go, but one, in particular, seems to have staying power and for good reasons as well. It’s based on eating similar to that of prehistoric man and it’s being touted as one of the best ways to eat. It’s called the Paleo diet. Continue reading…

Live longer by adding diet that mimics fasting

Think back to our ancestors, and we’re saying way back. These people didn’t have food readily available to them at all times so they would go through periods of “fasting” until their next meal. Well, this idea of fasting for a period of time is being heavily researched and the findings may aid in anti-ageing. Continue reading…

Low carb keto diet plan_ How to start a low carb diet

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Low carb keto diet plan_ How to start a low carb diet

A super EASY guide for how to start a keto diet or how to start a low carb diet. Includes basics of the keto diet plan, a low carb food list, and delicious keto & low carb recipes! Welcome to the Ultimate Guide to a Low Carb & Keto Diet Plan! If you are new to low carb or keto diets, you’ve come to the right place. This guide will show you everything you need to know about how to start a low carb diet, or how to start a keto diet. Then, be sure to check out all the keto diet recipes!

Download Your 7 Day Keto Kickstart and Meal Plan

WHAT IS A LOW CARB DIET PLAN?

A low carb diet plan is a way of eating that is high in fat, moderate in protein and low in carbohydrates. It ends the rollercoaster of blood sugar spikes and crashes, allowing the body to burn fat.

There are different variations of low carb, and the keto diet is a special type of low carb with added characteristics. The number of carbohydrates will vary depending on your insulin tolerance and activity level, but on average, these are the common numbers of carbs:

  • Keto diet – Under 20g net carbs per day (sometimes under 25g or 30g works)
  • Low carb diet – Under 50g net carbs per day
  • Moderate low carb diet – Under 100g net carbs per day

Some people opt to count carbs diligently and some choose to simply focus on eat low carb/keto foods.

WHAT ARE NET CARBS?

Net carbs is simply total carbs minus fiber and non-digestible sugar alcohols, like erythritol. (This doesn’t apply to high glycemic sugar alcohols, like maltitol.) We don’t have to count fiber and certain sugar alcohols in net carbs, because they either don’t get broken down by our bodies, are not absorbed, or are absorbed but not metabolized. 

Some people on a keto or low carb diet choose to count total carbs instead of net carbs. This makes it more difficult to fit in more leafy greens and low carb vegetables (which are filled with fiber), so you should only try that if you don’t get results with a net carb method. And, start with reducing sugar alcohols and low carb treats before deciding to do a “total carbs” method.

BENEFITS OF A LOW CARB OR KETO DIET

Low carb diets have numerous benefits, including:

  • Weight loss
  • Stable mood & energy levels
  • Blood sugar control
  • Reduced cravings & appetite
  • Lower blood pressure
  • Higher good cholesterol
  • Skin improvements
  • Digestive support
  • Even possibly increased lifespan

WHAT IS THE KETO DIET PLAN?

The ketogenic diet, or keto diet plan, is a specific type of low carb diet that is focused on a specific ratio of macronutrients, or macros, with a goal of reaching a state called ketosis.

Macronutrients are fat, protein, and carbohydrates. The ketogenic diet is generally 70% fat, 25% protein and 5% carbohydrates.

WHAT IS KETOSIS?

Ketosis is a metabolic state in which the body burns fat for fuel instead of carbohydrates. It’s very effective for weight loss, energy and mental clarity.

Ketosis is the primary goal of the keto diet plan. We achieve it by severely limiting carbohydrate intake, not calories, but calories are often restricted as a byproduct. In the absence of carbs, the body switches to burning fat for fuel.

Signs of ketosis include increased energy and focus, decreased appetite, and changes in smell of breath or urine. You can test yourself for ketosis using ketone test strips, or a blood monitor if you want to be super accurate (not usually necessary).

It usually takes about 3 days after starting a ketogenic diet to enter ketosis, but a few weeks before you are “fat adapted” and burn fat efficiently.

The keto diet plan has the same benefits as low carb diets in general (above), but they are usually amplified. In particular, the weight loss results, mental focus, and energy levels on a keto diet can be incredible.

Low carb keto diet plan_ How to start a low carb diet

HOW TO START A KETO DIET OR LOW CARB DIET

If you want to start a keto diet or low carb diet, it can be intimidating. I get it! I’ve been doing this for almost a decade (and it goes to show this is a sustainable lifestyle!), but it wasn’t always easy.

We all have to start somewhere. Just start – you got this!

Whether you’re looking for how to start a keto diet or how to start a low carb diet, there are lots of similarities. I’ll break it down for you to make it as easy as possible…

EASY STEPS FOR HOW TO START A KETO DIET OR LOW CARB DIET

The main point to start a keto diet plan or low carb diet is this:

RESTRICT CARBOHYDRATES. This is the most important! Restrict to less than 20g net carbs per day for a keto diet (some people can get away with under 30g). For a low carb diet, aim for under 50g net carbs per day, though some variations limit to somewhere between 50-100g per day (mostly if you are more active).

Get the carb limit down and you’re most of the way there! But to ensure your success, here are some additional tips for getting started on a keto diet or low carb diet:

  1. Limit protein intake. A keto diet or low carb diet is not a high protein diet! Low carb is generally higher in protein than keto, but be careful with both. High protein diets can stress the kidneys, and besides, excess protein converts to glucose. Make your protein intake a goal to meet each day, but more than that is not better.
  2. Use fat as a lever.  We’ve been taught to fear fat, but don’t! Both keto and low carb are high fat diets. Fat is our source of energy as well as satiety. The key to understand, though, is that fat is a lever on a low carb or keto diet. Carbs and protein stay constant, and fat is the one you increase or decrease (push the lever up or down) to gain or lose weight, respectively. So if your goal is weight loss, eat enough fat to be satisfied, but there’s no need to “get your fats in” once you’re satisfied.
  3. Drink lots of water. This is especially crucial on a low carb or keto diet. Why? When you eat carbohydrates, your body stores the extra as glycogen in the liver, where they are bound to water molecules. Eating low carb depletes this glycogen, which allows you to burn fat – but it also means you are storing less water, making it easier to get dehydrated. Instead of the traditional recommendation of 8 cups of water per day, aim for 16 cups when following a low carb lifestyle.
  4. Keep up electrolytes. The major electrolytes in our bodies are sodium, potassium and magnesium. Because a low carb diet (especially a keto diet!) reduces the amount of water you store, this can flush out electrolytes and make you feel sick (called “keto flu”). This is temporary, but you can avoid or eliminate it by salting your food liberally, drinking broth (especially bone broth), and eating pickled vegetables. Some people also choose to take supplements for electrolytes, but it’s best to first consult a doctor that understands and supports keto/low carb lifestyles.
  5. Eat only when you are hungry. Get out of the mindset that you need to eat 4-6 meals per day or constantly snack. Eating too frequently on a keto or low carb diet is not necessary, and can affect weight loss. Eat when you’re hungry, but if you aren’t, don’t. Eating fewer carbs will make this much easier, as it naturally suppresses appetite.
  6. Focus on whole foods. Although eating natural or whole foods is technically not 100% required to restrict carbohydrates, eating processed foods will not help you get rid of cravings or be good for your body. Check the section below for more on what low carb foods are best.
  7. Exercise. This is not required for a low carb diet, but recommended. You’ll feel better, improve your health, and if your goal is weight loss, it will happen faster!

LOW CARB & KETO MACRO CALCULATOR

The above list will give you the basics for how to start a keto diet plan or low carb diet plan.

But, if you really want to be sure that you are eating the right amounts, you need a low carb or keto macro calculator. Most calculators work for just one or the other, but Wholesome Yum has one that will do it for each diet type!

As a general guideline, here are the macro percentages for a low carb diet plan:

  • Fat: 40% to 70%
  • Protein: 20% to 25%
  • Net carbs: 15% to 30%

… and for a keto diet plan:

  • Fat: 60% to 75%
  • Protein: 15% to 30%
  • Net carbs: 5% to 10%

As you can see, these can vary. Our macro calculator tailors recommendations for you specifically!

WHAT TO EAT ON A KETO DIET OR LOW CARB DIET

One of the most common questions I get is, “what to eat on a keto diet?” or “what to eat on a low carb diet?” Fortunately, with the right resources, this is one of the easiest questions to answer.

In fact, the keto diet (and low carb diet) is probably the most flexible, sustainable eating lifestyle out there. You don’t have to feel deprived, bored or restricted. And, it doesn’t need to be complicated.

Let’s start with foods to get rid of…

FOODS TO AVOID ON A LOW CARB OR KETO DIET

Avoiding carbohydrates is probably the biggest adjustments for people starting a keto diet or low carb diet. Many of us were used to consuming carbs at every meal. Below is a list of foods to avoid on a keto or low carb diet:

  • Grains – including wheat, bread, pasta, rice, oats, cereal, corn, etc.
  • Sugar – including table sugar, candy, pastries, cakes, ice cream, chocolate, soda, juice, honey, maple syrup, etc.
  • Starchy vegetables – including potatoes, sweet potatoes, parsnips, etc.
  • Legumes – including beans, lentils, chickpeas, etc. (Peanuts are an exception in moderation.)
  • High-sugar fruits – including bananas, pineapple, oranges, apples, grapes, etc.
  • Low-fat dairy & milk – including all cow’s milk (except heavy cream is fine), low-fat cheese, etc.
  • Seed & vegetable oils – especially margarine, canola oil, corn oil, grapeseed oil and soybean oil
  • Processed “low carb” foods – this depends on ingredients, so read labels for hidden sugar, starch, and artificial ingredients

Get these out of your house if you can! If you have family members that are not on board, at least store these in a separate area from other foods to reduce temptation.

Also, always, always check labels for any food that has one. Avoid anything that has added sugar or starch as an ingredient, watching for different names like dextrose, maltodextrin, maple syrup, honey,  corn syrup, cornstarch, potato flakes, etc. Sometimes you’ll be surprised where you might find added sugars.

Now that you know what to avoid, here is a basic list of what to eat on a keto diet or low carb diet instead…

THE BEST FOODS FOR A LOW CARB OR KETO DIET

This simple list summarizes what to eat on a low carb diet. And, what to eat on a keto diet is basically the same:

  • Healthy fats like avocado oil, butter and coconut oil
  • Leafy greens like lettuce, spinach and kale
  • Low carb vegetables that grow above ground, like zucchini, cauliflower and asparagus
  • Meat like beef and pork
  • Poultry like chicken and turkey
  • Seafood like fish and shellfish
  • Full-fat dairy like cheese and heavy cream
  • Eggs
  • Sugar-free beverages like water, coffee and tea
  • Herbs & spices like basil, dill and cinnamon
  • Low carb condiments like mayo, hot sauce and mustard

You can also enjoy these on a low carb keto diet in moderation:

  • Low carb fruit like avocados (the fruit exception that doesn’t need to be in moderation), raspberries and coconuts
  • Nuts & seeds like almonds, macadamia nuts and sunflower seeds
  • Sugar-free sweeteners like erythritol, monk fruit and stevia
  • Low carb flours like almond flour, coconut flour and flax seed meal

The main difference between the low carb and keto diet is the macronutrient profile, but the types of foods you eat are mostly the same.

These are the basics, and it’s best to start simple – meat, eggs, fats, and veggies primarily. Once you have it down, you can experiment with extras like low carb/keto desserts or more advanced recipes, but it’s not necessary.

Now, let’s delve deeper into a specific list of low carb & keto foods you can eat!

LOW CARB & KETO DIET GROCERY LIST

The list above should give you an idea of the best and worst foods for a low carb diet. But if you’re starting out, it’s a good idea to know exactly what is included.

I have you covered:

  • Start with the complete low carb & keto food list! It includes everything you can and can’t eat on the keto diet or low carb diet, and lists the counts of both total carbs and net carbs, too. In fact, you can basically use it as a keto diet grocery list.
  • Stock your pantry with the keto low carb shopping list for your pantry.
  • Check out the keto low carb sweetener guide and calculator to help you choose the best ones and convert from one sweetener to another. You may or may not want to start with sweeteners right away, but it’s there when you’re ready.

LOW CARB & KETO DIET RECIPES

If you are looking for low carb recipes and keto diet recipes, you’ve come to the right place!

And, each has 10 ingredients or less, because I’m on a mission to show you that keto and low carb recipes don’t have to be difficult, time consuming, or taste like “diet food”. I love sharing just how delicious and easy keto/low carb can be!

To get you started, here are a few of the most popular low carb keto recipes:

  • Fathead pizza crust
  • Healthy taco salad
  • Keto chocolate fat bombs
  • Broccoli cheese soup
  • Low carb bread

Find more low carb & keto recipes in the low carb recipe index.

WEEKLY LOW CARB & KETO DIET MEAL PLAN

Ready to make your Low Carb or Keto Diet EASY??

If you want effortless meal planning that saves you time and helps you succeed on a low carb or keto diet, these are for you.

And best of all, you can able to TRY THE KETO MEAL PLAN FREE!

Click below for more info about the low carb & keto meal plan.

Your 7 Day Keto Kickstart and Meal Plan

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Your 7 Day Keto Kickstart and Meal Plan

So you have found the Ketogenic Diet. You have figured out your macros and you are itching to get started. Here is a 7 Day Keto kickstart Diet meal plan for one week of eating. If you are just getting started with a keto diet use this basic plan to help get going.

Download free Keto meal plan

I just started MONTH five of a ketogenic diet(45 lbs lost). *Update- I am now entering month 11 of my own Ketogenic Diet journey and I am now down 80 pounds! 260 down to 180!

I’m by no means an expert. I am now 46 years old and I have spent my entire life trying to lose weight. Ironically I have also spent years learning about nutrition and exercise. I thought I knew stuff. I really didn’t.

Figuring out macronutrients just comes naturally to me as I have done it so much over my life. By following a keto diet this is the first time I have seen any real success in losing the unwanted pounds. This despite years of working out and being active.

I have had a very successful go of it so far, and I feel that a lot of you who are trying to get started with a ketogenic diet may get overwhelmed and confused with all of the numbers and information that is coming at you. Hence this ketogenic diet meal plan. It is what I am doing to keep things simple. I am a guy. I need simple.

For me I think that success with a keto diet is found with having some base meals and adding some variety later on if needed. Hell I eat the same thing pretty much every day. Not too exciting but losing 45 pounds in 4 months IS exciting, so I am sticking with it. If it isn’t broke, don’t fix it.

7 Day Keto Diet Grocery List

The daily meals will be bacon and eggs, chicken with vegetables, and beef with vegetables. This are base meals and will provide good macros for some people. For others who need more food(fat) you can just add a keto friendly snack or 2 to get your macros up to where they need to be. This is what I need to do.

  1. A dozen eggs.
  2. A package bacon.
  3. Butter. (real butter)
  4. A pack of boneless SKIN ON chicken thighs
  5. 1 onion.
  6. 1 bell pepper (Green, red, yellow, that’s your choice.)
  7. Two bulbs of garlic. (Optional, but very heart healthy.)
  8. A big bag of mixed frozen vegetables, at least 12 cups worth. If you are not sure what to get, just pick something else that’s keto friendly like frozen broccoli.)
  9.  a bag of almonds, a jar of almond butter (very expensive – cheapest I can find is 10$ for 750g at Costco).
  10. A package of beef. You want to find some kind of beef that you can imagine cutting/dividing into 6 equal portions of about 5.5 ounces each(a bit bigger than a deck of cards.)

I Am Actually Cooking. Well…Some

I am not much for cooking but I am doing better. A ketogenic diet meal plan does work better when you have food ready to go. It takes the guess work out of things and we need to keep this as simple as possible in order to have success with the keto diet.

  1. Put the 12 thighs in to the oven with all the cloves from a bulb of garlic. You should separate the cloves, but you don’t need to skin them. The heat from the oven will do that nicely, and you can peel them when you eat it.
  2. While the thighs are cooking, hard boil the eggs. Then set them aside to cool.
  3. Take a skillet, put some butter in it, and then fry up the bacon. (Note: Some might argue that the butter isn’t needed. In my experience you can either grease up that pan somehow, or your first strips of bacon will come out burnt.)
  4. Dice up half the onion, save the other half for next week.
  5. Cut up the pepper
  6. You might need to take the chicken out at this point. If it’s done, pull it out, and let it cool.
  7. In the skillet (I love to use the bacon grease as a base) sauté the pepper and half onion, and another bulb’s worth of garlic cloves. (leave the skin on, just like before.)
  8. Add the beef and brown it.

Getting The Keto Meals Together

  1. Wash/rinse out 12 containers.
  2. In 6 of them, put 2 chicken thighs each. Share the garlic between them, and evenly divide the fat juice.
  3. In the other 6 evenly spoon out the beef/pepper/onion mix.
  4. Take the veggie blend, evenly pour it across the 12 containers, right on top of the meat.
  5. Put them all in your fridge. If you have minimal fridge space you could just put some in there, and then rest in your freezer. Just pull another out when you pull from the fridge.
  6. Pull out six plastic bags and put 2 hard boiled eggs in each.
  7. Evenly divide your remaining bacon by 6.
  8. Now brown bag it, and put it in your fridge.

The Macronutrients of the Ketogenic Diet Meal Plan

Right now you have 6 day’s worth of ketogenic meals in your fridge

  • 6 bags with 2 hard boiled eggs and bacon
  • 6 containers of thighs/veggies
  • 6 containers Beef/Veggies

Okay so this is only 6 days. Make extra for day 7 OR you can try to get creative and plan your own meals. Ruled.me has some awesome keto recipes if you are feeling brave.

*I messed up. The macros of each “meal” above are too high in protein and too low in fat so reduce the amount of meat in each meal by about half AND add 1-2 tablespoons of olive oil to each meal(or some cheese). Please forgive me!!

For this basic ketogenic diet meal plan I am going to use the following macronutrient profile that I helped someone set up for themselves:

Total calories- 1570

  • Net carbs  – 20g per day
  • Protein      – 80 g per day
  • Fat              – 130 g per day

Now divide each of those by 3(for 3 meals per day) and you get:

  • ≈7 net carbs per meal
  • ≈26 grams protein per meal
  • ≈44 grams fat per meal

Omg, so much math! If you halve the protein in each meal you will be pretty close to these totals PER MEAL! 

Personally I need more protein and fat each day and so will some of you. So I add in some snacks, cheese, or keto fudge during the day to get my macros up where they need to be. I also drink homemade Bulletproof coffee which for me is:

  • 1 cup coffee
  • 1 tbsp coconut oil/MCT Oil
  • 1 tsp butter
  • 1 tbsp full fat coconut milk(in a can)

This adds about 25g of fat to my day.

The nuts and almond butter are there in case you find yourself having cravings. Between staying on top of your water intake and small snacks of these you really shouldn’t be overly hungry. If you got hungry on Day One between breakfast and lunch, or lunch and supper while you’re still at work—then portion out some nuts (15 of them ).

You may also want to consider adding these fat boosting strategies:

  • Full fat cream, butter, coconut oil, MCT oil in your coffee.
  • Put a tablespoon of mayonnaise on the chicken while it’s baking.
  • Top the vegetables with some cheese before reheating.

Salt and Electrolytes With The Keto genic Diet

It’s  also worth pointing out that you may want to consider taking a multi-vitamin with the ketogenic diet meal plan. It is very low on Vitamins B1, D, E, and K. Calcium, Magnesium, Manganese, and Potassium are also very low, but we need to manage those as part of our electrolyte strategy anyways on keto.

Do not omit essential electrolytes: Sodium (Na+), Chloride (Cl-), Potassium (K+), Magnesium (Mg++), Calcium (Ca++), Phosphate (HPO4–), Bicarbonate (HCO3-). Lack of electrolytes or more pointedly the bodies primary electrolyte sodium (aka Salt) is responsible for lethargy, brain fog and keto flu symptoms on high fats diets.

You should be aiming for at least 8 cups of water a day. I have a 600ml bottle and I empty it at least 10 times a day. That is a lot of water and yes I am going to the bathroom a lot. Carbs hold water, so with minimal carbs this will speed up the flushing of water. So even more bathroom breaks.

Also do not discount the importance of sleep! It plays a huge part in every aspect of your life.

But How Do I Keep Track All of This?!

The “easiest” way to actually track your eating(and thus your macros)  for your ketogenic diet meal plan is to set up a free account with MyFitnessPal. This app is both web based and/or you can use it with your phone. I cannot stress the importance of tracking what you eat. Doing this has made all the difference in the world for me and is a huge part of my keto diet success.

Your 7 Day Keto Kickstart and Meal Plan

Once you get your account set up you just enter the food you eat and the app calculates your total consumption for each macro and your total calories. There is also a “bar code scanner” as part of the app. You use your phone to “scan” the bar code of the food you are eating and it enters it into your daily eating plan. Genius!

Calories in Vegetable Gyoza 2019

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Calories in Vegetable Gyoza 2019

Calories in Vegetable Gyoza 2019, Vegetable Gyoza, also known as Japanese vegetable potstickers, are a popular side dish at many Japanese restaurants. They are made with a slightly thick dough wrapper filled with a combination of finely chopped vegetables and seasonings and prepared in a variety of ways, including steamed, boiled or fried.

Calories in Vegetable Gyoza 2019

Typical vegetable gyoza is a single 0.7 oz. piece. Each piece of gyoza has 48 calories, according to CalorieKing. This calorie amount is for gyoza that is not fried.

Calories in Vegetable Gyoza 2019

Each vegetable gyoza has 3g of fat or 27 calories from fat. One dumpling also has more than 4g of carbohydrates or almost 17 calories from carbs and 1g of protein or 4 calories from protein.

Calories in Vegetable Gyoza 2019

You can make vegetable gyoza yourself or find them in your grocer’s freezer. The directions typically tell you to boil the gyoza in water and then pan-fry them until they’re crispy. To avoid adding calories, skip the pan-frying and serve the potstickers either boiled or steamed.

14 Day Keto breakfast with Calories, Ingredients, and Instructions

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1 Day

Breakfast Mini Crustless Quiches

14 Day Keto breakfast with Calories, Ingredients, and Instructions

Calories: 382, 28F, 22P, 5.3C

Ingredients

  • 14 large eggs
  • 3 plum tomatoes, diced
  • ⅔ cup mozzarella cheese, shredded
  • ⅓ cup pepper jack cheese, shredded
  • ⅓ cup sweet onion, diced
  • ⅓ cup sliced pickled jalapenos
  • ⅔ cup soppressata salami, diced
  • ⅓ cup heavy cream

Instructions

  • Preheat the oven to 325°F and grease a 15” x 11” muffin tin.
  • Combine all the ingredients in a mixing bowl, season with salt and pepper and whisk well.
  • Split the quiche batter into the muffin tin equally and bake for about 25 minutes.
  • Store in the fridge and reheat when ready to eat.
  • Nutrition is based on 4 Mini Crustless Quiches. Recipe makes about 12.

2 Day

Breakfast Mini Crustless Quiches

Calories: 382, 28F, 22P, 5.3C

Ingredients

  • 14 large eggs
  • 3 plum tomatoes, diced
  • ⅔ cup mozzarella cheese, shredded
  • ⅓ cup pepper jack cheese, shredded
  • ⅓ cup sweet onion, diced
  • ⅓ cup sliced pickled jalapenos
  • ⅔ cup soppressata salami, diced
  • ⅓ cup heavy cream

Instructions

  • Preheat the oven to 325°F and grease a 15” x 11” muffin tin.
  • Combine all the ingredients in a mixing bowl, season with salt and pepper and whisk well.
  • Split the quiche batter into the muffin tin equally and bake for about 25 minutes.
  • Store in the fridge and reheat when ready to eat.
  • Nutrition is based on 4 Mini Crustless Quiches

3 Day

Breakfast Mini Crustless Quiches

Calories: 382, 28F, 22P, 5.3C

Ingredients

  • 14 large eggs • 3 plum tomatoes, diced
  • ⅔ cup mozzarella cheese, shredded
  • ⅓ cup pepper jack cheese, shredded
  • ⅓ cup sweet onion, diced
  • ⅓ cup sliced pickled jalapenos
  • ⅔ cup soppressata salami, diced
  • ⅓ cup heavy cream

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 325°F and grease a 15” x 11” muffin tin.
  2. Combine all the ingredients in a mixing bowl, season with salt and pepper and whisk well.
  3. Split the quiche batter into the muffin tin equally and bake for about 25 minutes.
  4. Store in the fridge and reheat when ready to eat.
  5. Nutrition is based on 4 Mini Crustless Quiches

4 Day

Breakfast (makes 3 servings)

Chocolate Peanut Butter Muffins

Calories: 530, 41F, 15P, 4.5C

Ingredients

  • cup almond flour
  • ½ cup erythritol
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 1 pinch salt
  • ⅓ cup peanut butter
  • ⅓ cup almond milk •
  • 2 large eggs
  • ½ cup SF chocolate chips

Instructions

  1. Combine all the dry ingredients (except chocolate chips) in a large mixing bowl and stir.
  2. Add in the peanut butter and almond milk and stir to combine.
  3. Add in 1 egg at a time, incorporating each fully. 4
  4. Fold in the SF chocolate chips.
  5. Spray a muffin tin and add the batter. Bake for about 15 minutes at 350°F.
  6. This recipe makes 6 muffins, 2 muffins per serving.
  7. Nutrition is per 2 Chocolate Peanut Butter Muffins

5 Day

Breakfast Chocolate Peanut Butter Muffins

Calories: 530, 41F, 15P, 4.5C

Ingredients

  • 1 cup almond flour
  • ½ cup erythritol
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 1 pinch salt
  • ⅓ cup peanut butter
  • ⅓ cup almond milk
  • 2 large eggs
  • ½ cup SF chocolate chips

Instructions

  1. Combine all the dry ingredients (except chocolate chips) in a large mixing bowl and stir.
  2. Add in the peanut butter and almond milk and stir to combine.
  3. Add in 1 egg at a time, incorporating each fully.
  4. Fold in the SF chocolate chips.
  5. Spray a muffin tin and add the batter. Bake for about 15 minutes at 350°F.
  6. This recipe makes 6 muffins, 2 muffins per serving.
  7. Nutrition is per 2 Chocolate Peanut Butter Muffins.

6 Day

Breakfast Chocolate Peanut Butter Muffins

Calories: 530, 41F, 15P, 4.5C

Ingredients

  • 1 cup almond flour
  • ½ cup erythritol
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 1 pinch salt
  • ⅓ cup peanut butter
  • ⅓ cup almond milk
  • 2 large eggs
  • ½ cup SF chocolate chips

Instructions

  1. Combine all the dry ingredients (except chocolate chips) in a large mixing bowl and stir.
  2. Add in the peanut butter and almond milk and stir to combine.
  3. Add in 1 egg at a time, incorporating each fully.
  4. Fold in the SF chocolate chips.
  5. Spray a muffin tin and add the batter. Bake for about 15 minutes at 350°F.
  6. This recipe makes 6 muffins, 2 muffins per serving.
  7. Nutrition is per 2 Chocolate Peanut Butter Muffins.

7 Day

Breakfast Creamy Scrambled Eggs

Calories: 710, 57F, 37P, 2.5C

Ingredients

  • 4 large eggs
  • 2 tbsp butter
  • 4 strips bacon
  • 2 tbsp sour cream
  • ½ tsp salt
  • ¼ tsp black pepper
  • 1 stalk green onion

Instructions

  1. Crack eggs and add the butter to a pan on medium-high heat. Stir continuously with a silicone spatula.
  2. While stirring the eggs, let some bacon strips cook in another pan (or bake them).
  3. Alternate stirring the eggs on the heat and off the heat in 30-second intervals. When they’re almost done, turn the heat off. The eggs will continue cooking a little more from the residual heat from the pan.
  4. Add a tablespoon of sour cream and season with salt and pepper.
  5. Garnish with chopped green onion and enjoy

8 day

Breakfast Creamy Coffee Shake

Calories: 425, 38F, 25P, 1C

Ingredients

  • 1 cup brewed coffee
  • ¼ cup heavy cream
  • 1 tbsp coconut oil
  • 1 scoop vanilla protein powder (about 30 grams)

Instructions

  1. Add the brewed coffee to a blender or Nutribullet.
  2. To it, add the heavy cream, coconut oil, and the protein powder. We recommend a low carb one like Isopure or NowFoods.
  3. Blend on high for about 20 seconds.
  4. Be careful opening the blender as the hot coffee may have created a lot of steam.
  5. Enjoy warm!

9 Day

Breakfast Classic Steak & Eggs

Calories: 687, 52F, 43P, 5C

Ingredients

  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 4 oz. sirloin
  • 1 tbsp butter
  • 3 large eggs
  • Salt, pepper
  • ½ avocado

Instructions

  1. In a pan with the olive oil, cook the sirloin (or your favorite cut of steak) until the desired doneness.
  2. Meanwhile, melt the butter in a pan and fry the eggs until the whites are set and the yolk is to the desired doneness. Season with salt and pepper.
  3. Take the steak off the pan, slice it into bite-sized strips and season with salt and pepper.
  4. Slice up and salt the avocado and serve everything together.

10 Day

Breakfast Pepperoni Pizza Omelet

Calories: 600, 53F, 32P, 5C

Ingredients

  • 3 large eggs
  • 1 tbsp heavy cream
  • ½ oz. pepperoni slices
  • ½ cup shredded mozzarella
  • Salt, pepper, basil
  • 2 strips of bacon

Instructions

  1. Heat a small pan with some oil on a medium flame. Simultaneously, fry the bacon strips in another pan (or bake them).
  2. Beat eggs with heavy cream and pour it into the hot pan. Let them cook until almost done and add some pepperoni slices to one side.
  3. Sprinkle mozzarella cheese over the pepperoni along with salt, pepper, and basil and fold the omelet over.
  4. Let cook for another minute and serve with a side of bacon!

11 Day

Breakfast Creamy Scrambled Eggs

Calories: 710, 57F, 37P, 2.5C

Ingredients

  • 4 large eggs
  • 2 tbsp butter
  • 4 strips bacon
  • 2 tbsp sour cream
  • ½ tsp salt
  • ¼ tsp black pepper
  • 1 stalk green onion

Instructions

  1. Crack eggs and add the butter to a pan on medium-high heat. Stir continuously with a silicone spatula.
  2. While stirring the eggs, let some bacon strips cook in another pan (or bake them).
  3. Alternate stirring the eggs on the heat and off the heat in 30-second intervals. When they’re almost done, turn the heat off. The eggs will continue cooking a little more from the residual heat from the pan.
  4. Add a tablespoon of sour cream and season with salt and pepper.
  5. Garnish with chopped green onion and enjoy!

12 Day

Breakfast Green Breakfast Smoothie

Calories: 500, 39F, 30P, 4C

Ingredients

  • 1.5 cups almond milk
  • 1 oz. spinach
  • 50 grams avocado
  • 1 tbsp coconut oil
  • 10 drops liquid stevia
  • 1 scoop vanilla protein powder (about 30 grams)

Instructions

  • Combine all the smoothie ingredients in a blender or Nutribullet.
  • Blend on high until everything is smooth and creamy.
  • Enjoy!

13 Day

Breakfast Easy Blender Pancakes

Calories: 450, 29F, 41P, 4C

Ingredients

  • 2 oz. cream cheese
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1 scoop vanilla protein powder (about 30 grams)
  • 1 dash cinnamon
  • 10 drops liquid stevia (optional)
  • 1 pinch salt

Instructions

  1. Add all the ingredients into a blender or Nutribullet.
  2. Blend on high until everything is smooth and creamy.
  3. Heat a griddle to medium heat and add the pancake batter into 4-5 inch diameter rounds.
  4. Cook until you see bubbles forming at the surface and the edges look dry.
  5. Flip and cook for a few more seconds.
  6. Enjoy with butter and a drizzle of sugar-free maple syrup.

14 Day

Breakfast Sausage, Egg & Cheese

Calories: 574, 49F, 27P, 1C

Ingredients

  • 3 oz. breakfast sausage (e.g. Jimmy Dean)
  • 1 large egg
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 slice cheddar cheese
  • Chives or green onion for garnish

Instructions

  1. Cook the breakfast sausage and egg (sunny side up or over easy) in a lightly oiled pan.
  2. Arrange them with a slice of cheddar and drizzle with some hot sauce if you’d like.
  3. Top with chives or green onion for garnish

THANK YOU FOR READING!

Thank you for reading our Ultimate Guide to 14-Day Keto breakfast Meal Plan!

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How To Use It To Lose Weight And Reduce Belly Fat

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Lose Weight And Reduce Belly Fat

Apple Cider Vinegar For Weight Loss: How To Use It To Lose Weight And Reduce Belly Fat
Apple cider vinegar has long been used for its health benefits. It is made with apples that cut or crushed and combined with yeast to convert their sugar into alcohol. Then bacteria are added to ferment the alcohol into acetic acid. A low-calorie solution, apple cider contains potassium along with amino acids and antioxidants that promote health. Moreover, it has to disinfect properties that can kill toxins and harmful bacteria thriving in the body. In fact, some studies have attributed ACV as a potential weight loss drink. The health benefits of apple cider vinegar are aplenty. The acetic acid present in it is known to reduce belly fat and further suppress body fat build up. Basically, apple cider vinegar is derived after elaborate processing and fermenting of apple pulp. There are a plethora of benefits that this nature’s elixir encompasses in it. Here’s how apple cider vinegar helps shed kilos and how you can use it in your weight loss. We tell you about apple cider vinegar for weight loss.

Apple cider vinegar for weight loss
Here are some benefits of apple cider vinegar that makes it great for weight loss:

  1. A low-calorie drink
    About 100 grams of apple cider vinegar has about 22 calories, which means it makes for a low-calorie drink that can help boost weight loss. Adding a tablespoon of ACV into a glassful of water and drinking first thing in the morning may help burn belly fat.
  2. Helps suppress fat accumulation
    According to the study published in Bioscience, Biotechnology and Biochemistry, acetic acid, which is the main component of vinegar, was found to suppress fat accumulation in animal studies. The team of researchers also investigated the effects on obese Japanese in a double-blind trial. In conclusion, the daily intake of apple cider vinegar might be useful in the prevention of metabolic syndrome by reducing obesity.
  3. It helps you keep fuller for long
    A study published in the Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that acetic acid present in ACV leaves you feeling fuller for longer, thereby, preventing you from overeating or cravings. This will help you eat fewer calories and lead to actual kilos lost on the scale.
  4. Manages blood sugar levels
    Studies suggest that apple cider vinegar helps stabilize blood sugar levels, especially after eating a meal high in carbohydrates. Stabilized blood sugar levels are important to ensure a healthy and effective weight loss.

How to use apple cider vinegar for weight loss?

Lose Weight And Reduce Belly Fat

Never consume apple cider vinegar as it is; instead, dilute the solution in water to ensure you are not consuming a large amount of acid.

You could use it as a salad dressing with olive oil to promote sustainable weight loss.

It is best to spread the consumption in two to three doses through the day and it is best to drink ACV before meals.

While occasional usage of apple cider vinegar may be safe, excessive usage may reverse the good effects as ACV is highly acidic. It may irritate your throat if you drink it often or in large amounts.

Please note: While proponents of apple cider vinegar may claim that has numerous weight loss benefits and there are a few studies to prove its capability, it is suggested that one should drink this solution under the strict supervision of a health expert. Always consult a doctor or nutritionist in case you are thinking of consuming it. Also, needless to say, you must pair it with a healthy diet and exercise to lose weight.

summery

Apple Cider Vinegar For Weight Loss: How To Use It To Lose Weight And Reduce Belly Fat Apple cider vinegar has long been used for its health benefits.

What is the best 12-week diet plan for fat loss?

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What is the best 12-week diet plan for fat loss

What is the best 12-week diet plan for fat loss? As the weather gets warmer we become more self-conscious about our weight. Here are some free fat-loss plans and tips to destroy the flab and keep hard earned muscle! Try them now.

The Question: As the weather gets warmer we become more self-conscious about our weight. Since summer is right around the corner it is time to get our fat loss diet in check.

  • What is the best 12-week diet plan for fat loss?
  • What is a reasonable amount of weight to lose in 12 weeks?

What are some important tips for someone who wants to lose the fat, but maintain their muscle gains?

Show off your knowledge to the world!

The Winners:

  • 1. soundcheck129 View Profile
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  • What Is The Best 12-Week Diet Plan For Fat Loss?

Call me old-school, call me lazy, but I like to keep things simple. Dieting down can be mentally challenging in itself, so I don’t see any need to over-complicate things.

When I’m cutting, I like to keep my training as similar as possible to my bulking. That means four days of intense lifting. The only real difference is the amount of added cardio. Fat loss isn’t rocket science – you just have to create a caloric deficit, which can be surprisingly simple if you’re doing a lot of activity.

The reason I like a four-day split for cutting is because it gets you into the gym frequently enough to burn a lot of calories, but no so much so that you’ll be limited to a lot of isolation exercises on individual body parts to allow for adequate recovery and may be worn out.

Also, a four-day split gives you a lot of options to prevent boredom from setting in. I feel the 12-week period should be split into two six-week segments.

During the first six weeks, you could run a split like this:

  • Monday – Lower
  • Tuesday – Upper
  • Wednesday – Cardio and Abs
  • Thursday – Upper
  • Friday – Lower
  • Saturday – Cardio and Abs
  • Sunday – Off

This way, the second six weeks could have this split:

  • Monday – Full Body
  • Tuesday – Cardio and Abs
  • Wednesday – Biceps, Back
  • Thursday – Triceps, Chest
  • Friday – Cardio and Abs
  • Saturday – Full Body
  • Sunday – Off

Obviously, this isn’t set in stone, but you get the idea.

On lifting days, you should warm up with 10 minutes of cardio and cool down with 20 minutes of HIIT. For cardio days, aim for a 10 minute low-intensity warm-up, followed by 30 minutes HIIT and a 10 minute low-intensity warm-down, in addition to ab work, which can be performed before or after cardio. Try to vary your exercises, whether it be jogging, elliptical or exercise bike, just to keep things fresh.

Because creating a caloric deficit is essential to losing fat, you’ll want to find out what your maintenance level of intake is. If you already have an idea, that’s excellent. If not, you may want to refer to an online calculator, such as this one. However, every one is different, so you may not get the exact number.

In order to cut weight, you’ll probably want to eat at about 500 calories below maintenance. If at any time you feel as though you’re losing too much or too little, simply adjust the amount you’re eating. But what to eat?

For the first six weeks, aim for a 40/40/20 (Protein/Carbs/Fat) macronutrient split. This will give you plenty of protein for building and preserving muscle, which will help keep your metabolism firing. In addition, you will have plenty of carbohydrates for energy as well as essential fats.

During the second six weeks, aim for a 40/25/35 or 40/20/40 split. While I’m not a big proponent of carbohydrates, I do realize that they can leave some individuals looking bloated, which is NOT what you want when you’re planning on showing off.

But with 25% of your intake coming from carbohydrates, you won’t feel like you’re on a hardcore diet and wonder if you’re going to make it, so it’s not a huge sacrifice. Plus, you’ll be getting a lot of your calories from fats, which means some delicious food (think bunless cheeseburgers and steak), so you may not feel like you’re dieting at all! But you also won’t have to worry about staying in ketosis, which can be a hassle.

What Is Ketosis?Ketosis is a state characterised by elevated levels of ketone bodies in the blood, occurring when the liver converts fat into fatty acids and ketone bodies (which can be used by all of the body for energy as an alternative to glucose). These ketone bodies are a by-product of the lipid metabolic pathway after the fat is converted to energy.

Similarly, I don’t recommend carbohydrate cycling, because you may be prone to make mistakes and keeping track of different splits for different days can be more trouble than it is worth. While it is effective, I think the “best” program would be one that allows you to live your life and not become obsessed with diet or training.

As for what exactly you should be eating…try to eat things you like, it will be easier to stick with the diet. However, it’s important to try to eat filling, low-GI foods that will keep you satisfied.

So this means you may want to get your protein from lean meats, fish, cottage cheese and protein powders; carbohydrates from oats, whole wheat bread, sweet potatoes, fruits and fibrous veggies; and fats from peanut butter, olive oil and almonds.

Additionally, meals with all three macronutrients are best for keeping blood glucose levels in check. Eating every two or three hours should keep you from feeling as though you’re starving when it comes time to eat, so smallish meals won’t be so hard to take.

If you find that being disciplined causes you to crave “dirty” foods, allow yourself a cheat meal once every week or every two weeks. But make sure this is a cheat meal and not a cheat day – it’s easy to go overboard, so just give yourself a treat and move on when you are satisfied.

Switching diet and training in the middle of your cut will prevent your body from adapting and you from getting bored or frustrated.

Cutting Tips:

1. Stay Positive

Cutting can be tough, but stick with it. Even if progress seems slow, don’t get frustrated, keep your eyes on the prize.

2. If You Make A Mistake, Get Over It

Don’t dwell on any bumps in the road. No problem can’t be reversed with a little extra effort. Get back to your plan as soon as possible, and alter it if need be.

3. Work Hard, The Results Will Be Greater

You will only get out what you put into this process. Take it seriously and think of how awesome it will be when you are turning heads everywhere you go. A little pain pays off in the long run and makes you a stronger person.

4. Do What Works For You

Don’t compare yourself to others and don’t judge your progress on anyone else’s. Also, don’t adopt some method of training or nutrition just because Joe Bro says it’s the right way.

Insulin spike? No food before bed? The laws of thermodynamics can’t be defeated – at the end of the day, it’s calories in vs. calories out.

5. Drink Plenty Of Water…And Not Much Else

Drinking water will keep you satisfied and purify your body. In addition, the more you drink, the more efficient your body becomes at getting rid of water, so you will look more vascular down the road. Drinking alcohol is not your friend during cutting, and other beverages will cost you precious calories without filling you up.

6. Count Everything

You’ll be surprised how quickly an extra scoop of oats, an extra slice of cheese or an extra splash of milk can add up. But look for unlikely sources of calories too, such as supplements. If your pre- or intra-workout supplement is loaded with calories, usually from simple carbs, consider an alternative or cut it out altogether. Cycling off may make it more effective in the future.

7. Don’t Overdo It

Looking great is super, but if you’re not feeling great, then it’s irrelevant. Don’t make yourself sick with too much activity or too little food. Maintain a reasonable deficit and ensure that you take in enough calories to fuel your exercise.

8. Emergency Munchies

If you get very hungry between meals (which is unlikely if you’re eating every 2-3 hours, but still), chew on some sugar-free gum or grab a diet soda. While not exactly nutritious options, they are nearly calorie-free and can keep you on track.

What Is A Reasonable Amount Of Weight To Lose In 12 Weeks?

If you’re creating a deficit of about 500 calories daily, as I recommended above, you’ll lose roughly one pound per week. This would mean that you can expect to lose 12 lbs during the 12 week period. However, cutting carbohydrates during the last six weeks may prompt you to lose additional weight.

If you factor in the potential inaccuracy of metabolic calculations, you could reasonably expect to lose 15lbs. Don’t try to drastically cut calories in an attempt to drop more weight – this is not healthy and can slow down your metabolism in the long run. In addition, you’ll be dropping lean mass, not fat. Twelve to fifteen pounds is still considerable, though, so don’t sweat it.

How Can Someone Lose The Fat, But Maintain Their Muscle Gains?

If you want to keep as much muscle as possible while shedding fat, you have to be realistic. Don’t think that the less you eat, the more fat you’ll lose. If you don’t provide adequate energy for your body, you will store fat and drop muscle.

You’ll also want to keep your protein intake high. This will ensure that you have sufficient amino acids for the maintenance and building of muscle, even as you are in a caloric deficit. In addition, you’ll probably want to use a BCAA or EAA product to boost recovery and provide your body with amino acids without having the significant caloric weight of whole food.

Top Selling BCAA Products:

  • BCAA 1000 Caps – By Optimum
  • BCAA – By Supplement Direct
  • BCAA 1000 – By Higher Power
  • Other BCAA Products…

Other supplements you may want to use are multivitamins, fat burners and pre-workout products. Multivitamins will help you make sure your diet does not have glaring deficiencies, which is possible when you are on a reduced-calorie plan.

Fat burners are not necessary, but they will probably flush water out of your system and boost your metabolism slightly. Lastly, pre-workout products can help you get through tiring workouts when your stomach is growling. Watch out for the caloric content though!

Also, try to eat smaller, more spread out meals. This will prevent you from becoming ravenous from waiting too long and will keep your energy levels stable. Whatever you do, don’t skip meals! This will be more harmful than helpful.

Remember to work out hard and believe in yourself. You can definitely maintain your gains if you continue to challenge your muscles and keep your protein intake at adequate levels. On the flip side, though, don’t overdo the cardio – this can lead to muscle loss if done excessively and proper nutrition is not followed.

Other than that, give it your best and make sure you get plenty of water. Anyone can be shredded if they want to be.

What Is The Best 12-Week Diet Plan For Fat Loss?

There are many fad diets out there and commercials, “Lose 30 lbs in one month”, “I dropped 2 dress sizes in a week”. These are outrageous claims and if they some how end up working, it is only temporary.

Fat loss takes time and effort. Yes someone could drop 5-10 lbs in a week or two, but how much of that is going to be fat and how much is going to be muscle? The key to fat loss is minimizing muscle loss. The more muscle your have the more calories your body will burn. So if you lose muscle, your body will need fewer calories to run. It is simple.

First and foremost, you need to have your nutrition in order. Start out by finding your BMR. This will give you a baseline for your daily calories to maintain your current weight.

Women:

Men:

  • If you are sedentary : BMR x 20 percent
  • If you are lightly active: BMR x 30 percent
  • If you are moderately active (You exercise most days a week.): BMR x 40 percent
  • If you are very active (You exercise intensely on a daily basis or for prolonged periods.): BMR x 50 percent
  • If you are extra active (You do hard labor or are in athletic training.): BMR x 60 percent

Once you have this figured out, you will have a good idea of how many calories you burn a day just living.

Nutrition

Ok your have your BMR, now what? Well you need to figure out how much fat you want to lose. It is a good idea to lose 1.5 – 2 lbs of week. While you may not think that is a lot, over a 12 week period it adds up to almost 25 lbs. Who wouldn’t want to lose 24 lbs and maintain as much muscle as they could?

So let’s say you are going to shoot for 2 lbs a week. It takes roughly 3500 calories to lose a lb, so two lbs would need 7000 calories, or 1000 calories per day. Now you don’t want to create that 1000 calorie deficit in diet alone, so let’s create a 500 calorie deficit from diet. So now take your BMR you calculated earlier and subtract 500 from it and you will have your new calorie total for the day.

The key to a successful diet is also nutrition timing. If your adjusted daily calorie total is 2400 calories, for a 200 lb man that is 25 and is 6 foot tall and moderately active, you are going to see a lot better results splitting those 2400 calories into 5 – 6 meals a day instead of 1 giant meal.

You will also need a good balance of protein, carbs, and fats. Carb cycling is a great way to lose weight while maintaining muscle. You use a mixture of high, medium, and low carb days that a based on your workouts. Lets see an example:

Say your workout schedule is broken down into a 5-day split such as the following:

  • Monday – Chest
  • Tuesday – Back
  • Wednesday – Off
  • Thursday – Shoulders
  • Friday – Arms
  • Saturday – Legs
  • Sunday – Off

Your body is going to most likely exert more energy on your leg and back workout days, than your arm or shoulder days. They are also bigger muscle groups and need more nutrients. So make these your high carb days. These days, you have a higher amount of your calories from good carbohydrates and less of them from fats. Protein will stay the same typically no matter what day it is.

So let’s go back to the example with a daily calorie requirement of 2400 calories. Protein is be around 200 – 300 grams a day. You typically will keep protein to 1 to 1.5 grams per lb you weight. So let’s go with 250 to stay right in the middle. So 250 grams of protein is going to be 1000 calories, since 1 gram of protein is equal to 4 calories.

The same goes for carbohydrates; 1 gram of carbs is equal to 4 calories. So for a high carb day you will want to get around 250 grams as well. So that gives you another 1000 calories, and a total of 2000 calories from carbs and protein alone, leaving you 400 for healthy fats. 1 gram of fat is equal to 9 calories, so that would leave you with about 45 grams of fats for the day. You would want to split these number up into your 6 meals relatively equally giving you:

For a 5 meal plan, per meal:

  • Protein – 50 Grams
  • Carbs – 50 Grams
  • Fats – 9 Grams

For a 6 meal plan, per meal:

  • Protein – 42 Grams
  • Carbs – 42 Grams
  • Fats – 7 Grams

Now on your other workout days, you will drop the carbohydrate intake to about half and up the fat content. So you will be left with, 250 grams of protein, 125 grams of carbs, and 100 grams of fats.

You will also try to keep the carbs around your workout and first thing in the morning. So if you workout in between your 4 and 5 meal of the day, you typically would put the carbs into your breakfast, pre- and post-workout meals and keep the rest of your meals with just protein and fats.

Finally the off days you would see another drop in carbs to about 50 grams a day and would keep them in your first meal of the day. You would again add more healthy fats to your daily total and a little more protein to make up for the calorie drop. So based on the workout schedule above your days would follow this plan:

  • Monday – Mid
  • Tuesday – High
  • Wednesday – Low
  • Thursday – Mid
  • Friday – Mid
  • Saturday – High
  • Sunday – Low

What Are Good Food Choices?

Protein

  • Fish
  • Chicken
  • Eggs
  • Lean Beef
  • Lean Steak
  • Protein Powder
  • Low Fat Yogurt

Good Carbohydrates

  • Oatmeal
  • 100% Whole Wheat Bread
  • Whole Wheat Pasta
  • Brown Rice
  • Yams
  • Sweet potatoes
  • Beans
  • Fruits And Vegetables

Healthy Fats

  • Fish Oil Supplements
  • Natural Peanut Butter
  • Almonds
  • Walnuts
  • Olive Oil
  • Avocados
  • Flax Seed Oil

Cardio/Weight Training

So now we have figured out where the first part of the calorie deficit is coming from, now we figure out the second half. Most of us will get a lot of this taken care of with weight training, but cardio still has to be used as well.

Cardio is a necessary evil for weight loss. Nobody likes to do it, but it is essential to a healthy plan. When I start out a diet, I like to start with different types of cardio to make it interesting and less stagnant. So you need to come up with a 500 calorie deficit from weight training and cardio.

On days you are training, you will have to do less cardio than on off days. I typically start with 20 minutes of low intensity cardio every morning when I wake up. It gets my day going and gets it out of the way. On days I train, that is all the cardio I do.

On off days I will do another round of cardio later in the day. Now as your weight goes down, so will your BMR. While you could adjust the daily totals every couple of weeks, I find it easier to add 5 minutes of cardio to each session as my weight loss starts to stall. This is an easy way to adjust for the slight difference your body will need in calories without all the math, ha-ha.

What Is A Reasonable Amount Of Weight To Lose In 12 Weeks?

As I stated earlier, don’t expect to drop 40 lbs in a month. You are going to lose a lot more muscle than fat by taking things to extreme and will most likely put it right back on once you go off the diet. It is safe to go by the standard 1.5 to 2 lbs a week. It is a healthy, maintainable way to lose weight and keep it off for good!

You have to eat to lose weight; don’t think skipping meals is going to make you lose weight faster. Your body needs it nutrients to be healthy and keep your body burning like a well oiled machine.

Multivitamins

Take a good multi, such as Animal Pak or Orange Triad. This will help you get in any vitamins and minerals your body will be missing from your food sources.

BCAAs

Go out and get some BCAAs – either bulk or from a product like Xtend. These will help your body keep muscle while you are in a calorie deficit. Sip them during your workout or cardio and you will save a lot more muscle.

  • Drink Plenty of Water!
  • Water is key to weight loss, try to shoot for at least a gallon a day.
  • Stay Positive
  • If you lay out a good plan and stick to it, you will see results.
  • Allow For Slip Ups

No one is perfect. You are not going to be able to make every meal of hit every macro exactly, things are going to come up. Just stay positive and work around things. If you feel you need it, add an extra 10 minutes of cardio to make up for it. Life is full of little things that will make it hard to stick to the plan 100 percent.

Summer is coming. With summer comes less clothing – and that shouldn’t scare you! It is more than possible to get beach-worthy in 12 weeks.

Just know, your diet can make or break your goal. Sure lifting and cardio are just as important – but without a solid meal plan, you’re selling yourself short and keeping your goal at a further distance.

What Is The Best 12-Week Diet Plan For Fat Loss?

So you want to lose some excess body fat in 12 weeks. Remember, while I will share some golden tips for your diet – you MUST have a good training (lifting and cardio or HIIT) regimen to team up with it.

Diet alone cannot always get you in peak physique – just as training alone cannot. And though I hope my dietary suggestions for a 12-week goal will help you, the results will depend on the effort you put forward and how committed you are to your goal. You may also consider supplementation – but I’m going to share my advice on nutrition alone, to enforce just how important it is.

First valuable tip – do not buy into fad diets or “diet systems” that guarantee a weight loss in a ridiculously short amount of time. Most of the time, they don’t work to promote body-fat loss, just weight loss overall, which can include water weight and some hard-earned muscle!

As much as I respect the ketogenic dieting techniques for cutting, I personally prefer to eat the same foods I consume on a bulk, but just tweak my regimen in a way that promotes fat loss. Three ‘macros’ of my diet are protein, fats and carbohydrates.

Protein

A must. Protein building blocks, amino acids, help build up your muscle mass, among other physiological purposes. So maintaining a positive intake of protein can help you keep your muscle mass while trying to lose excess body fat!

Keep your protein sources lean, especially for fat loss goals! Lean meats and fish, egg whites, low fat tofu, natural peanut butter, cottage cheese and your protein shakes are great choices.

Carbohydrates

If you are going to keep eating carbs, be sure to choose carb sources lower on the glycemic index. Simple carb sources (higher on GI scale) are more likely to cause a higher spike in insulin levels, leading to a “sugar crash,” and causes greater fat storage.

Some good lower GI carbs include; oats, rice, whole grain breads and pastas, and sweet potatoes.

Fiber is also very important. Good for healthy BMs and prolonging the feeling of hunger. Get enough fibrous vegetables. Pound them green vegetables! (Like you need an excuse to eat broccoli).

Fats

Don’t avoid fats. You need fats. Just make sure they are “good” fats. Good fats include unsaturated forms – includes the EFAs. Omega 3s and omega 6s are great choices for cooking or eating. You can find these fats in olive oil, canola, your natural peanut butter, almonds, avocados, to name a few.

Avoid dietary cholesterol as best you can, and shy from saturated fats as much as you can. Using low fat dairy, not frying your foods and following the same guidelines for lean meats are just a few ways you can reduce your intake of unhealthy fats quite well.

Eating “good” fats along with your carbs can support healthy insulin levels the carbs would potentiate.

Often someone who feels hungry can be simply satisfied drinking enough water. So having at least 2L a day can help you reduce food consumption. Sufficient water helps on meal plans that have higher protein too.

When Your Progress Slows

Now, I’m sure you’re not jumping into your 12-week goal with no knowledge of fitness or nutrition, but for the sake of reminding, eat frequent meals of similar caloric value throughout your day, rather that HUGE meals only say, 3 times a day. For the same reason, to keep that metabolism burning with fuel, NEVER skip a meal. Ever.

Find out your metabolic rate, and then decide what your caloric intake should be. A pound of bodyweight is roughly 3500 calories, so for a loss of a pound per week, 500 calories a day should be burned over how much you take in. But as your goal is body fat loss, use the BF calipers (I use the Accu-Measure brand) to accurately measure your progress.

If you aren’t seeing progress, you may slowly drop you daily caloric intake a couple hundred calories in a week.

Your meal schedule can change based on your daily schedule, but try to eat within half an hour of waking up, and aim for a meal every three hours thereon, until you sleep. Or base it on your workouts. I eat about 45 minutes to an hour pre workout, then within a half hour of the end of the workout.

I keep my protein:carbs:fats ratio for each meal about 40:30:30 – but precision is not critical. You can tweak the percentages a bit, but keep protein around 40% and get at least 25% carbs. As I do cardio on days I don’t lift, I tend to keep my caloric intake the same for “training” and “non-training” days.

An example of my lifting day meal plan:

  • 0700 – Wake up, Triple S
  • 0730 – Meal 1
  • 1000 – Meal 2
  • 1100 – Workout (Lifting)
  • 1230 – Meal 3
  • 1600 – Meal 4
  • 1900 – Meal 5
  • 2200 – Meal 6
  • 2230 – Pre-sleep shake, sleep

On cardio days:

  • 0630 – Wake, Cardio
  • 0730 – Meal 1
  • 1000 – Meal 2
  • 1300 – Meal 3
  • 1600 – Meal 4
  • 1900 – Meal 5
  • 2200 – Meal 6
  • 2230 – Pre-sleep shake, sleep

What Is A Reasonable Amount Of Weight To Lose In 12 Weeks?

Weight loss can include fat loss, water weight loss and fat loss. The most important thing for your 12-week goal is to lose excess body fat, reducing your BF%. So if you happen not to lose a couple dial notches on the bathroom scale, don’t worry. You may have gained muscle – even better! So unless your 12-week goal is to make weight for a boxing match, weight loss shouldn’t be your main concern.

Also, don’t freak out if your Myotape says you gained size. This too can be added LBM. You should be thrilled!

The easiest way to accurately measure your fat loss achievements is to break out the BF calipers. Even try out one of those bathroom scales that also measure body fat percentage (but do not take it so accurately). Seeing what your BF% has changed to will let you know how well you’ve done!

That said, I wouldn’t recommend aiming for more than a pound a week in weight loss. While I still feel that amount is pushing hard – trying to lose faster than that can really burn you out, and isn’t so healthy IMO. And of course, the most important thing is to stay in good health!

How Can Someone Lose The Fat, But Maintain Their Muscle Gains?

Eat.

Just as you need to eat to see fat loss, to maintain your lean muscle, keep eating. Eating enough calories to maintain your LBM will help you greatly. Maintaining a positive nitrogen balance (amino acids) will prevent catabolism – so keep that protein intake going!

Do Not Stop Lifting.

Do not focus so great on cardio or HIIT that you fall off on your lifting. Not only can you lose some muscle, but also you won’t be burning as many calories either.

Stick To It.

Even if you don’t see progress after a few weeks, keep at it. Follow a solid meal plan and training program and progress will be seen. It may not happen as fast as you’d like, but it will happen – just be consistent.

Commit.

It takes a lot to get in shape. No one said it would be easy. You may have to say no to a few beer-nights or refuse one of your mom’s meals (the odd cheat meal won’t kill you though) – but the results are worth the effort.

Cheers

Intro

The process of getting yourself to embark on a 12-week plan is one of excitement and anticipation. Hopefully, you have met with your doctor before you start, so that there will be not one serious problem you will have to face.

The key to this 12-week diet is having motivation and keeping it throughout the whole 12 weeks. When things get hard, think in terms of days and not in terms of week or months. Each day is a building step to a glorious day of happiness for you inside and out.

Don’t rush it because you will get your just rewards at the end. The right combination of mental toughness as well as physical toughness combined with proper nutrition will have you losing weight in record time.

What Is The Best 12-Week Diet Plan For Fat Loss?

Nutrition: Stage 1

The first thing that anybody should be talking about is nutrition. Nutrition is not the icing on the cake. It’s the cake. Nutrition is the backbone of any fat loss, muscle gain, or bulk diet. A good fat loss diet puts emphasis on eating a protein, carb, and fat source in every meal as well as taking in adequate leafy vegetables and fruits.

I feel a person should eat 4 to 6 balanced meals a day which speed your metabolism up and keeps you satisfied throughout the day. This site has numerous calculators that will help you determine how many calories should be eating at every meal as well as the amount of protein, carb, and fat source you should take in.

This is a list of protein, carb, and fat sources that I find are very beneficial for losing weight and maximizing muscle:

My Great List of Protein Sources

  • Turkey
  • Salmon
  • Steak
  • Tilapia
  • Chicken
  • Tuna
  • Egg Whites

My Great List of Carb Sources

  • Rolled Oats
  • Whole Wheat Pasta
  • Yams
  • Grits (Southern Delight)
  • Brown Rice
  • Banana

My Great List of Fat Sources

  • Olive Oil
  • Udo’s Oil
  • Natural Peanut Butter
  • Almonds

Vegetables

  • Spinach
  • Broccoli
  • Romaine Lettuce
  • Asparagus

Right now, I am currently in a cutting cycle and in this last 4 weeks I started a new nutrition plan. Basically, I am taking in equal ratios of carbs to protein for 4 meals and then the last two meals I cut out carbs. Why? After 6pm or 7pm, my body does not like carbs and has a tendency to store it in my stomach area which I am working on sculpting right now. I suggest you don’t take in carbs after 7pm for your benefit.

A typical meal for me looks like this:

  • 6 oz Chicken
  • 1/2 cup of brown rice
  • Spinach leaves with olive oil

Everything is covered right there in that meal.

Cheat Meal

You should have one cheat meal a week to reward yourself for doing such a good job. This meal should be yours to delight in. Eat doughnuts, hamburgers, or anything you crave.

Training: Stage 2 Part One

As for training, I suggest if you are a beginner to start off with doing 3 sets of 10 on exercises. You will rest for 2 minutes between each set. It is good way to get your body adjusted to lifting weights. I would suggest you do bench press, deadlifts, and squats for 3×10 during each exercise. The chest, back, and legs are the biggest body parts on your body and working them will create a chain reaction of growth for your body.

After a month (4 weeks), you should change up your program and do 5 sets of 5. This is great for gaining strength and muscle mass. You will go hard, but the mind-muscle connection has to be there for maximum benefit. The workout will be hard and you will be sore, but that is where the nutrition will fill in the gaps.

The last 4 weeks is what I like to call the finishing stage. In this stage, I recommend doing 3 sets of 15. The weights you use won’t be as heavy, but your mind will make it seem like it is. You will be focusing in on every rep and squeezing at the top of each movement. You will do the same basic big 3 exercises during this stage. This stage will get you conditioned and in top shape.

During those 12 weeks, hit those big 3…three times a week

Training: Part 2

Cardio should also be included in this stage. You don’t just need a one type of cardio like HIIT, but a combination plan. On non-workout days, I like to run between 15 and 20 minutes first thing in the morning at high intensity pace.

Running before eating is great and you will be amped. Workout days you should run 35 to 40 minutes preferably after your workout at a low-intensity pace. For me, anything under 130bpm is low intensity and anything higher is high intensity. If you don’t want to run on a treadmill or elliptical go shoot hoops or jump rope. Variety is the spice of life, so make cardio fun and exciting.

Supplements

Supplements are the icing on the cake. If everything is perfect, you should add these in. I am not going to recommend you take fat burners during this first 12 weeks because your probably will lose enough weight before you need that in the beginning. Only when everything is working, should you take a fat burner.

Since these workouts are hard, I suggest you take:

  • Protein
  • Protein fuels recovery after workouts and can be used to fill in the hunger gaps between meals.
  • Multivitamin
  • Keeps your bases covered
  • Fish Oil

Omega-3s are needed, so take them (Optimum is a good brand)

What Is A Reasonable Amount Of Weight To Lose In 12 Weeks?

A reasonable weight to lose in 12 weeks is 12 pounds which averages to a pound a week. I really don’t care about the weight loss. The true scale is what is your body fat percentage. You may have become a lot more muscular in those 12 weeks and looking at the scale or using a BMI calculator could be the wrong way to go. Getting a skin caliper test or another test to see how much body fat I have taken off is so rewarding and I love it.

How Can Someone Lose The Fat, But Maintain Their Muscle Gains?

  • Don’t kill yourself with cardio. Do not become a cardio bunny and do cardio every day for like 50 minutes at rapid pace. This will have you losing some muscle.
  • Protein. Keep the protein flowing in your system while working out hard.
  • Keep up great meal planning. Eat what you are supposed to eat. Be motivated to succeed.

If you are dedicated to lose weight, you will do it. Do not let anybody tell you different.

Ketogenic Diet: Beginner’s Guide to Keto and Weight Loss

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Understanding the Keto Diet

The ketogenic diet is a low carb, moderate protein, and high fat diet which puts the body into a metabolic state known as ketosis.

When you’re body is in a state of ketosis, the liver produced ketones which become the main energy source for the body.

The ketogenic diet is also referred to as keto (key-toe) diet, low carb diet, and low carb high fat (LCHF).

So why is it so awesome and why is it taking the world by storm?

Because it completely reverses how your body functions (in a good way) along with changing how you view nutrition.

It’s based around the premise that your body was designed to run more efficiently as a fat burner than a sugar burner.

Your 7 Day Keto Kickstart and Meal Plan

Fat Burner vs Sugar Burner

When you eat something that is high in carbs (that yummy donut), your body will produce glucose and insulin.

  • Glucose is the easiest molecule for your body to convert and use as energy so that is why it’s the preferred energy source for your body.
  • Insulin is produced to process the glucose in your bloodstream by transporting it around your body.

This sounds pretty efficient, right? The problem with this is that when glucose is used as a primary energy source, fats are not needed for energy and therefore are stored.

With the average person’s diet, glucose is the main energy source.

This initially doesn’t seem like a problem until you realize that the body can’t store that much glucose. This becomes an issue for you because the extra glucose gets converted into fat which is then stored.

Because your body uses glucose as it’s main energy source the glucose that is converted into fat doesn’t get used.

When your body runs out of glucose it tells your brain you need more so you end up reaching for a quick snack like a candy bar or some chips.

You can begin to see how this cycle leads to building up a body that you don’t really want.

So what’s the alternative?

Become a fat burner instead of a sugar burner.

When you lower your intake of carbs, the body begins to look for an alternative energy source and your body enters a metabolic state known as ketosis.

Ketosis is a natural process and makes perfect sense when you think about the human body.

You’ve probably heard of the fact that you can go weeks without food but only a couple of days without water.

The reason for this is ketosis. Most people, for better or for worse, have enough fat stored on them to fuel their body for a while.

When your body is in a state of ketosis, it produces ketones. Ketones occur from the breakdown of fat in the liver.

You might be thinking why isn’t the body constantly breakdown fats in the liver? Well, when your body is producing insulin, the insulin prevents the fat cells from entering the bloodstream so they stay stored in the body.

When you lower your carb intake, glucose levels, along with blood sugar levels, drop which in turn lowers insulin levels.

This allows the fat cells to release the water they are storing (it’s why you first see a drop in water weight) and then the fat cells are able to enter the bloodstream and head to the liver.

This is the end goal of the keto diet. You don’t enter ketosis by starving your body. You enter ketosis by starving your body of carbohydrates.

When your body is producing optimal ketone levels you begin to notice many healh, weight loss, physical and mental performance benefits.

All of these benefits are why we help people with the ketogenic diet in our Keto Dash program.

Contents

  • Benefits of a Ketogenic Diet
  • What Do I Eat on a Keto Diet?
  • Keto Macros
  • Getting Started With Keto
  • How to Reach Ketosis
  • Types of Ketogenic Diets
  • Exercise on Keto
  • Dangers of a Keto Diet
  • What Happens to My Body?
  • Keto Flu
  • Common Side Effects on a Keto Diet
  • Saving Money and Budgeting on Keto

Benefits of a Ketogenic Diet

When people say that the keto diet changed their life they are not exaggerating.

When you decide to switch over to the ketogenic diet, you quickly realize that it is more than just a diet.

It’s a completely new lifestyle that offers numerous benefits.

Weight Loss

Most people look into a specific diet to lose weight and the keto diet is one of the most effective ways to lose weight in a healthy manner.

Because the ketogenic diet is using body fat as an energy source, your body will begin to burn the unwanted fat causing obvious weight loss benefits.

On keto, your insulin (the fat storing hormone) levels drop which allows your fat cells to travel to the liver and get converted into ketones.

Your body effectively becomes a fat burning machine.

Control Blood Sugar

Unfortunately, many people suffer from diabetes which is caused by your body’s inability to handle insulin.

Keto naturally lowers blood sugar levels due to not eating as many carbs so your body can’t produce glucose.

Keto has been shown to have huge benefits for people that are pre-diabetic or have Type II diabetes.

Because the ketogenic diet helps you to maintain more consistent blood sugar levels you find that you have more control of your everyday life while on keto.

Mental Focus

This is one of those benefits that has to be experienced.

You can’t understand how cloudy carbs make your thinking until you can ween yourself off of them.

When on the ketogenic diet you experience increased mental performance.

In fact, many people partake in keto simply for this reason.

The reason why you experience an increase in mental performance is that ketones are a great fuel source for your brain.

The increase in fatty acids has a huge impact in brain function.

Increase in Energy

You’ve already learned that keto helps your body turn fat into an energy source.

But, did you know that this helps to increase your energy levels?

Because your body can only store so much glucose, when it runs out it means your body has run out of fuel (energy) and it needs more.

Carbs also cause spikes in blood sugar levels and when those levels drop you experience a crash.

Keto helps to provide your body with a more reliable energy source allowing you to feel more energized throughout the day.

Better Appetite Control

When eating a diet that is heavy in carbs you can often find yourself hungry a lot sooner than you expected after eating a meal.

Because fats are more naturally satisfying they end up leaving our bodies in a satiated state for much longer.

That means no more random cravings along with feeling like you’re going to collapse if you don’t get something in you immediately.

Epilepsy

Keto has been used to treat epilepsy since the early 1900s. It’s still one of the most widely used treatments for children suffering from uncontrolled epilepsy today.

A big benefit of the ketogenic diet for people that suffer from epilepsy is that it allows them to take fewer medications which is always a good thing.

Cholesterol & Blood Pressure

The ketogenic diet has been shown to improve triglyceride levels and cholesterol levels.

The benefit?

Less toxic buildup in the arteries allowing blood to flow throughout your body as it should.

Low carb, high fat diets show a dramatic increase in HDL (good cholesterol) and a decrease in LDL (bad cholesterol).

Studies have shown that low-carb diets show better improvement in blood pressure over other diets.

Because some blood pressure issues are associated with excess weight, the keto diet is an obvious warrior against these issues due to its natural weight loss.

Insulin Resistance

Insulin resistance is the reason why people suffer from Type II diabetes. The ketogenic diet helps people lower their insulin levels to healthy ranges so that they are no longer in the group of people that are on the cusp of acquiring diabetes.

Acne

One of the more common improvements that people on the keto diet experience is better skin.

What Do I Eat on a Keto Diet?

Unfortunately, on the ketogenic diet you can’t eat whatever you want. However, unlike many other diets, once you find yourself in ketosis your cravings for the things you can’t eat usually disappear and if they don’t?

Well, there are plenty of alternatives for the things you are used to eating.

Remember, that the goal of the ketogenic diet is to get your body into a state of ketosis and to do that you need to reduce your carb intake.

It’s important to understand that carbohydrates are not only in the junk foods that you love, but also some of the healthier foods that you enoy.

For example, on keto you nee to avoid wheat (bread, pasta, cereals), starch (potatoes, beans, legumes) and fruit.

There are small exceptions like avocado, star fruit, and berries as long as they are consumed in moderation.

Foods to Avoid

  • Grains – wheat, corn, rice, cereal
  • Sugar – honey, agave, maple syrup
  • Fruit – apples, bananas, oranges
  • Tubers – potato, yams
  • Legumes

Foods to Eat

  • Meats – fish, beef, lamb, poultry, egg
  • Leafy Greens – spinach, kale
  • Above ground vegetables – broccoli, cauliflower
  • High fat dairy – hard cheeses, high fat cream, butter
  • Nuts and seeds – macadamias, walnuts, sunflower seeds
  • Avocado and berries – raspberries, blackberries, and other low glycemic impact berries
  • Sweeteners – stevia, erythritol, monk fruit, and other low-carb sweeteners
  • Other fats – coconut oil, high-fat salad dressing, saturated fats, etc.

To get the complete list of foods you can eat while on keto check out our keto shopping list.

Sample Recipes

Here are just some of the amazing keto recipes that you can cook yourself and enjoy.

Keto Macros

Understanding macros is a key component to being successful on the ketogenic diet.

What are macros?

They are the main sources of calories in your daily diet.

The macros that you need to keep an eye on are:

  • Fats
  • Protein
  • Carbs

Because the ketogenic diet is a high fat diet, the majority of your daily calories will come from fats.

The general ratio of macros to follow is 70% fats, 25% protein, and 5% carbohydrates.

This means that 70% of your calories will come from fats, 25% from protein, and 5% from carbs.

When starting off on keto your daily, net carbs shouldn’t exceed 20g. That means even if your recommended daily macro carb count is 27g, you still want to stay below 20g.

Totals Carbs vs Net Carbs

It’s important to understand that not all carbs are treated equal when looking at a nutrtion label.

On nutrition labels you’ll Total Carbohyrates along with a further breakdown of Fiber and Sugars.

On keto, you care about net carbs which are Total Carbohydrates – Fiber = Net Carbs.

Because fiber doesn’t have an affect on your blood sugar levels it is considered a net zero carbohydrate.

Vegetables on a Ketogenic Diet

Vegetables are tricky on a ketogenic diet because we’ve been raised under the idea that vegetables are healthy and they are. However, almost all of the vegetables that you consume today contain carbs.

Some more than others so it’s important to understand the ones that have a safer number of Net Carbs.

VegetableAmountNet Carbs
Spinach (Raw)1/2 Cup0.1
Bok Choi1/2 Cup0.2
Lettuce (Romaine)1/2 Cup0.2
Cauliflower (Steamed)1/2 Cup0.9
Cabbage (Green Raw)1/2 Cup1.1
Cauliflower (Raw)1/2 Cup1.4
Broccoli (Florets)1/2 Cup2
Collard Greens1/2 Cup2
Kale (Steamed)1/2 Cup2.1
Green Beans (Steamed)1/2 Cup2.9

If you’re looking for more details on Keto and vegetables then check out 11 Low Carb Vegetables That You Can Safely Eat on the Ketogenic Diet.

Getting Started With Keto

So how do you get started with keto?

That’s a great question and it’s something we detail in our Keto Dash program.

However, if you want to run wild on your own then here is what you need to do:

  • Understand meal planning and plan your meals so you don’t have missteps
  • Calculate your daily macro goals
  • Drink enough water
  • Get enough sleep

When getting started on the keto diet you don’t want your daily macros to exceed 20g of carbs. You want to cut out all sugar and have most of your carbs come from vegetables.

The reality of it is, if you want to get started you can dive right in after you’ve caclulated your macros and planned some meals.

If you aren’t in the mood to plan meals right now then you can just go off of what your body tells you and eat what when you feel hungry although this usually means you fall short of your macro goals.

It’s important that you make food that you enjoy. Being on keto isn’t about missing out on food you love. It’s about finding the food you love that is great for your body.

How to Reach Ketosis

In our book, The 3-Day Weight Loss Manual, we show you a strategy that will help you to achieve ketosis as quick as possible.

While you don’t need to reach ketosis as quickly as possible, many people consider ketosis as their first successful milestone on the keto journey.

The following steps will help you great in achieving that:

  1. Restrict your carbohydrates: Because you can’t reach ketosis when your body still has a supply of glucose to burn you need to restrict your net carb intake to 20g or less than a day.
  2. Restrict your protein: Protein is a sneaky one in this diet because if you eat too much it ends up being converted into glucose which will keep you out of ketosis.
  3. Stop worrying about fat: To lose fat on keto you need to consume healthy fats so you have to get rid of the mental block you have regarding it. You don’t lose weight on keto by feeling hungry all of the time.
  4. Drink water: Water is a huge deal on keto. You need to consume a lot of it. You need to stay hydrated and be consistent with the amount of water you drink. To make it easier, consider drinking water with fresh lemon in it or grab some MiO with Electrolytes.
  5. Careful with snacking: One thing you have to keep in mind is that even while eating keto you can suffer from small insulin spikes. Less snacking means less of those giving you a better chance of losing weight.
  6. Consider fasting: Fasting in this case means intermittent fasting. Instead of eating throughout the day, you block off an 8-hour window and in that window you eat all of your meals.
  7. Add exercise: A simple 20-30 minute walk everyday can help regulate weight loss and your blood sugar levels. An increased workout routine usually means an adjustment in macros so just because keto gives you more energy don’t assume that things can stay the same when you run a marathon.
  8. Look at supplements: Supplements can help you reach ketosis quicker but they aren’t necessary.

Always check food labels to see the ingredients being added. If sugar is at the top of the list then runaway.

How to Know if You’re in Ketosis

There are a couple of different ways to see if you’re in ketosis.

One common way is by using ketone test strips but these aren’t meant to determine if you’re body is in ketosis. They just let you know the level of ketones that your body is getting rid of.

Another method is by using a blood glucose monitor. The issue with this is that the blood strips can be expensive over time and once you’re in ketosis you start to understand your body a bit more so you won’t keep running back to the monitor.

You can also check for ketosis by keeping an eye on these symptoms:

  • Increased Urination: Keto is a natural diuretic, so you’ll find yourself going to the bathroom more than usual. Especially with how much water you are consuming. Acetoacetate (say that 3x fast), a ketone body, is excreted through the urine so this is another cause for more frequent bathroom breaks.
  • Dry Mouth: The more fluids your body is releasing, the more you may experience dry mouth. This is your body telling you that you need more electrolytes. This is why we add MiO with Electrolytes to our water. Also keeping salty things around helps like pickles.
  • Bad Breath: Acetone is a ketone that is partially excreted through your breath. It doesn’t have the most pleasant smell but thankfully it disappears in the long run.
  • Reduced Hunger and Increased Energy: This is the most telltale sign of ketosis. You find that you don’t get hungry as often and you can go much longer without food because you have more energy.

The last thing you want to do is drive yourself crazy measuring and testing your ketone levels. Once you get a handle on things, you’ll learn to see the signs that your body is giving you.

To learn more about ketosis check out 7 Signs You Might Be in Ketosis When Doing the Ketogenic Diet

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Types of Ketogenic Diets

A common question, especially from people that workout, is whether or not you can build muscle while on keto and the answer is yes.

Many workout programs have you consuming a large number of carbs to fuel your workouts. While on keto you don’t need to bulk up on the carbs but you can fill up your glycogen stores so that you have glucose ready for a workout.

If you wish to add mass to your body while on keto it is suggested that you consume 1.0 – 1.2g of protein per lean pound of body mass.

This is also why there are different types of keto diets because some people have different needs.

  • Standard Ketogenic Diet (SKD): This is the classic keto diet that everyone knows and most people stick with as they are aiming for weight loss.
  • Targeted Ketogenic Diet (TKD): This is a small variation where you follow SKD but intake a small amount of fast-digesting carbs before your workout.
  • Cyclical Ketogenic Diet (CKD): This is the more complication variation that is usually used by bodybuilders. In this variation you give yourself one day a week to carb up to resupply glycogen stores.

Which one is for you? If you work out pretty hard then you might want to do TKD or CKD.

Exercise on Keto

The concern of people that exercise is that keto will affect their physical performance and while this isn’t true in the long run, in the short term you might experience a small drop.

Your body needs a small amount of time to adjust.

The good news is that studies (on trained cyclists) have shown that the ones on the ketogenic diet didn’t find a compromise in their aerobic endurance or a loss of muscle mass.

If you want to learn more about exercising on a ketogenic diet then read Ketogenic Diet 101: Exercising on a Keto Diet.

Dangers of a Keto Diet

Are there dangers to the ketogenic diet?

If your body is producing too many ketones then it enters ketoacidosis.

This is highly unlikely to occur in normal circumstances because for most people it’s a challenge to get into optimal ranges for ketosis so getting into the range where you need medical intervention isn’t likely.

What Happens to My Body?

Because you’re completely rewiring how your body works, your body isn’t going to be ready right away to handle the breakdown of fats for energy.

While switching over to keto you’ll have a transition period where your body uses up all of its glycogen stores and doesn’t have enough enzymes to breakdown fat to produce ketones.

This means your body doesn’t have an immediate fuel source which causes a lack of energy and general lethargy.

In the first week of keto, many people will report headaches, mental fogginess, dizziness, and aggravation. Sounds terrible, right?

This is caused by the loss of electrolytes so it’s important that you continue to replace them throughout the day. Keeping your sodium (don’t hesitate to salt things up) intake up throughout the day can prevent all of these side effects.

Sodium helps with water retention in the body along with replenishing the much needed electrolytes.

The groggy feeling and fatigue actually has a term and it’s keto flu.

Keto Flu

Keto flu is a very common experience that some people go through when transitioning over to keto. It usually goes away in just a few days but if you don’t take active measures to find against it, it can stay around for much longer.

When transitioning to keto, you may feel some slight discomfort along with fatigue, headaches, nausea and cramps. It doesn’t sound fun but it’s important to understand why it is happening.

  • Keto is a diuretic. Everytime you urinate you’re losing electrolytes and water. To combat this you can make a nice drink from a bouillion cube (makes a great broth) or by using MiO with Electrolytes and increasing your water intake. The goal is to replace the electrolytes that you’re using.
  • You’re transitioning. All of the years of carb intake has trained your body to convert carbs into glycogen so when you transition over to keto, your body needs time to make the proper adjustments. You can’t simply make your car go electric by adding another battery.

For most people, eating less than 20g of net carbs a day will get them on track for ketosis within a matter of days. To ensure the process is sped up some you should aim for less than 15g of net carbs daily.

Continue to monitor your electrolyte intake along with how much water you are drinking.

To learn how to beat the Keto Flu go on and read Keto Flu: What It Is and How to Beat It the Healthy Way.

Common Side Effects on a Keto Diet

As with any drastic change you make to your body’s chemistry there are going to be side effects. Of course, if you think about it, your current way of eating has side effects as well.

On keto there are known ways to combat each of these side effects so you’re in good hands.

Cramps

Do to keto being a diuretic, when your body is losing out on fluids it can cause cramps.

To prevent these you do the same thing that you’re already doing to prevent keto flu and that is upping your water and sodium intake. If you find that cramps still persist then you might look into taking a magnesium supplement.

Constipation

Because the most common cause of constipation is dehydration, you can help prevent it by increasing the amount of water you drink everyday.

You also want to ensure that the vegetables you eat contain quality fiber.

If you find that these aren’t enough then you can add psyllium husk powder to your drinks and meals.

Heart Palpitations

This sounds scarier than it really is. Your heart may begin to beat faster and harder when transitioning over to keto, it’s pretty standard.

If you the problem persists over a long period of time then you need to make sure you’re drinking enough water and eating enough salt.

If the problem continues to persist then you may need to add a potassium supplement to the mix.

Reduced Physical Performance

Since your body hasn’t fully transitioned to burning fat yet, it loses out on its energy source pretty quickly if you are exercising hard.

As your body shifts to using fat for energy, you’ll find that all of your strength and endurance will return to normal.

Saving Money and Budgeting on Keto

Some people believe that eating keto is more expensive but this isn’t true. Initially, you might find yourself needing to restock the pantry with keto-friendly items but beyond that, eating keto isn’t more expensive than eating normally.

You’ll find that you can buy meat in bulk and you can store the unused portion in the freezer.

Because you’re on keto, you’ll find that you are cooking more for yourself instead of going out. This shows significant savings along with helping you build your budget.

Cooking on Keto also doesn’t have to be time-consuming. Love your instant pot? Then here are instant pot keto recipes just for you.

Here’s What Happened I Tried the Ketogenic Diet for 30 Days

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Here's What Happened I Tried the Ketogenic Diet for 30 Days

Is the high-fat, low-carb diet all it’s cracked up to be? Learn what I ate, my challenges and successes, plus my overall results and takeaway from one month on the keto diet.

As a rule, I shy away from extreme diets or eating regimens. Atkins? Never heard of him. Whole 30? Wholly not going to bother with it. Paleo? Some things are better left in the history books.

However, the simplicity of the ketogenic (keto for short) diet appealed to me, and seeing as I had a wedding to attend—and a bridesmaid’s dress to wear—I needed something effective to help me shed some weight, and fast.

How I Did the Keto Diet

I started the diet about one month before the wedding with a goal of losing 10 pounds. Since a low-calorie diet can produce up to a 2-pound weight loss per week, 10 pounds over 4 weeks didn’t feel extreme. If the keto diet was as great as had been touted, I thought 10 pounds would be easy.

Before I started, I spent several weeks researching the diet, following keto-focused Instagram accounts for inspiration, and creating a plan. This last part, I would soon learn, was the most important thing for my journey. (learn more about keto meal plans)

I used an online keto calculator to set a goal for calories, carbs and fat. I mostly followed the suggestions, with the exception of fat. The calculator suggested over 200 grams of fat each day. That’s tough to hit without loading ghee into my coffee or swigging some coconut oil before lunch. Can it be done? Absolutely. I just couldn’t get there. For me, the focus was on reducing carbs. I let the other pieces just fall into place.

I also asked a friend to join me as an accountability partner. She had tried the keto diet before with good success, so having a guide for my myriad questions was a big help. It was also nice to have someone to message at 10 p.m. when I really wanted a cookie so she could commiserate with me. (We agreed the cookie would be delicious, and then ate a cheese stick.)

My Biggest Challenges

Eating only 20 grams of carbs a day is hard.

The keto diet is a high-fat and low-carb (HFLC) diet. I would actually describe it as extremely low-carb—you’re allowed to eat just 20 grams in a day. Some people on keto follow a net-carb plan (you can subtract the grams of fiber from a food’s total carbs) and you’re allowed to eat more carbs in a day. For my 30-day diet and for the sake of simplicity, I stuck with total carbs.

As a rule, I aimed for 20 grams each day—2 at breakfast, 5 at lunch, 3 for snacks and 10 for dinner. I found that if I aimed for 20, I’d land under 30. That was successful enough for me.

The key to hitting my number was to plan, plan, plan. I worked out all three meals, down to the condiments, plus snacks on the weekends. If I knew what I was having and what I was “allowed” to have while staying under my carb goal, I found managing the infrequent cravings and hunger pangs easier. I can’t stress enough the importance of planning for a keto diet.

The food is repetitive.

I ate a lot of bacon, cheese, eggs and meat (steak and chicken mostly). For a person whose eating philosophy is typically more plant-based and whole-food-focused, eating processed pork products every morning took a lot of personal persuasion. It also took a complete mental shift, because eating multiple pieces of bacon every day for weeks on end goes against everything I’ve been taught for personal health.

This is a very low-calorie diet.

Keeping your carb count near 20 reduces your calorie consumption too. Carb-heavy foods are some of the most calorie-dense foods we eat, mainly because we eat a lot of them. If you cut carbs, you dramatically reduce your possible calorie intake. (See the 30 best low-carb foods.)

Some days, I struggled to get over 1,200 calories. For my goal of 1,800 calories, I fell short almost every day. That’s enough of a calorie deficit to produce weight loss, even without the low-carb count.

I came down with “keto flu.”

The “keto flu” is a term you’ll see on keto blogs and forums. For me, it was a very real event, but not everyone will experience it.

As your body breaks through the carb cycle and enters ketosis (where you rely on ketones, instead of carbs, for energy), you may experience fatigue, mental fogginess, even irritability. My “keto flu” only lasted a day, and once I passed it, I never experienced the symptoms again. I even ate a cookie one day during the diet to celebrate my birthday. I certainly came out of ketosis when I ate that treat, but I didn’t experience any repercussions for it. 

My Biggest Successes on Keto

I beat my weight-loss goal.

While I set out to drop a quick 10 pounds, I quickly surpassed it. I was down 10 pounds within three weeks and hit 15 pounds two days before the wedding.

It’s important to keep in mind that when you are on a low-carb diet of any type, you will lose several pounds in the first few days. That’s because your body is dropping water weight. When I returned to typical eating over the wedding weekend, I gained 4 pounds. I didn’t overeat that weekend. I had just returned to eating carbs, so the water weight returned.

I had more energy (but not every day).

Even better, I had so much energy and I didn’t experience the typical midafternoon energy slumps. Gym time was a bit of a challenge. Without carbs, your body has to burn fat for energy, and some days, that will leave you feeling drained of energy during a workout. That’s OK. Stick with it, and try again tomorrow.

I learned to be very creative in the kitchen.

It’s almost impossible to eat at a restaurant and keep your keto status. (After the third time you ask the server to hold the onions from your chicken fajitas, you’ll just want to never go into a restaurant again.) Luckily, I consider myself an adventurous cook, frequently cooked at home before the diet, and am willing to try new recipes.

Of course, with a keto plan, your ingredient list is dramatically shortened. I scoured blogs, Instagram, Pinterest and other sources for reliable recipes, and then I put my own thinking cap on and came up with several dishes I really enjoyed.

Write the recipes down, use a meal-tracking app like MyFitnessPal to record the ingredients, and you can figure out if a recipe can work for you. It takes a bit more work than an average meal plan, but it’s worth it.

I broke my sugar addiction.

You can’t eat sugar on the keto diet, and most of the no-carb sugar substitutes don’t work for me. So when you’re left with no recourse, you just have to quit sugar.

That doesn’t mean the cravings went away. In the first few days, the cravings for a peanut butter cup or a soda or even just a banana were strong. (Here’s when having an accountability buddy really helps.) When you go back to typical eating, you might find (as I did) that many foods you ate regularly are now just too sweet to finish.

Lifelong Takeaways from My 30 Days on Keto

I won’t be staying with keto for the long term—I really can’t eat that much bacon anymore—but I do expect I’ll return to it several times a year. If nothing else, the strict diet works well for me as a reset after a long splurge (hello, holidays!), and my month-long experiment helped me break my dependency on some of my biggest food crutches (sugar, pasta, crackers).

The keto diet is not for everyone. Certainly, if you have blood sugar issues or a history of heart disease, you should not try this diet without a doctor’s supervision. However, if you’re in good health and are looking for a weight-loss jump-start, the keto diet might be the opportunity you’ve been looking for. I just hope you really like bacon.

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